Picnic Time Squirrel Feeder
Picnic Time Squirrel Feeder
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Picnic Time Squirrel Feeder

Regular price
£17.99
Sale price
£17.99
Regular price
Unit price
per 

If you find the same item cheaper elsewhere, we’ll match it! Simply send us a copy of the competitor's online price, by email to hello@gardenature.co.uk, ensuring date and price are shown. We will match the competitor price if within our Terms & Conditions.
Overview

Description

This charming picnic bench-style squirrel feeder is the perfect perch for wild squirrels in your garden. It features two screws to allow corn on the cob to be mounted on the table, a squirrel’s favourite meal! 


Features

Sustainable materials:  Made from FSC certified cedar, this squirrel feeder is heavy duty, natural, and sourced sustainably.

Durable: This squirrel feeding bench is made from durable materials that will cope with the regular visits from squirrels. The feeder doesn’t need any maintenance, painting, or chemical treatment. 


Specifications

Size: W23cm x D28cm x H16cm

Material: Cedar

Colour: Wood


Top 5 Squirrel Facts

1. The largest species of squirrel is the Indian giant squirrel, which can grow up to 1 metre in length. The smallest is the tiny African pygmy squirrel which is just 7-13cm long.

2. Squirrels have four front teeth which never stop growing. This ensures that their teeth don’t wear down from munching on nuts and other objects.

3. Squirrels can be categorised into three types: ground squirrels, tree squirrels and flying squirrels.  Flying squirrels can glide through the air due to the flaps of skin which connect their limbs, providing a wing-like surface.

4. Squirrels are one of the most important animals for helping the spread of oak trees. They store acorns in the ground but only recover around 70 per cent of them, allowing the forgotten acorns to grow into healthy trees.

5. Red squirrels were widespread in the UK until the 1940s but suffered a sharp decline in numbers and are now classified as an endangered species. Their threatened status is largely down to the rise of the grey squirrel population, due to their larger and more robust nature.

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